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What to do After Receiving a Parking Ticket

What to do After Receiving a Parking Ticket - this blog was written by TicketKick.com, Your Go-To Resource for Beating Traffic Tickets.  

For many it’s not so much the cost of the parking ticket (although fees can range anywhere from $50 to over $200) but the principal and for those that want to fight their ticket they can do so in a 3 step process.

The California Vehicle Code provides a parking ticket can be fought by:

Step 1. Initial Review heard by the issuing agency

Step 2. Administrative Hearing heard by a qualified examiner contracted or appointed by the issuing agency

Step 3. Trial De Novo heard in Superior Court by a judicial officer

Additionally parking ticket fines can potentially be waived during the time you are contesting it upon proof of inability to pay. - this blog was written by TicketKick.com, Your Go-To Resource for Beating Traffic Tickets 

To beat your California Red Light, Speeding, Red Light Photo/Camera, Cell Phone, and Other Traffic tickets, call TicketKick.com.  If you don’t win, we don’t win.  It’s as simple as that. Go to www.TicketKick.com or call us at 800-580-1902.

This blog was written to provide information related to traffic tickets in California, is based on opinion only, is not legal advice, and is for informational purposes only.

Posted in Traffic Tickets
Oct 29th, 2013

Golf Cart Drivers Not Exempt From Texting While Driving Bans

Golf Cart Drivers Not Exempt From Texting While Driving Bans - this blog was written by TicketKick.com, Your Go-To Resource for Beating Traffic Tickets.  

A new law in Florida bans texting while driving and for more than 50,000 golf cart drivers in the Villages that means no texting for them too (WFTV.com).

In California golf carts are treated like motorcycles. According to the California Vehicle Code, golf carts are only subject to certain to the laws which are applicable to a motorcycle (section  24001.5). No special exemption for motorcycles is listed in California texting while driving ban which would mean golf carts aren’t exempt either.  - this blog was written by TicketKick.com, Your Go-To Resource for Beating Traffic Tickets 

To beat your California Red Light, Speeding, Red Light Photo/Camera, Cell Phone, and Other Traffic tickets, call TicketKick.com.  If you don’t win, we don’t win.  It’s as simple as that. Go to www.TicketKick.com or call us at 800-580-1902.

This blog was written to provide information related to traffic tickets in California, is based on opinion only, is not legal advice, and is for informational purposes only.

Oct 22nd, 2013

Avoid Becoming a Speeding Ticket Statistic

Avoid Becoming a Speeding Ticket Statistic - this blog was written by TicketKick.com, Your Go-To Resource for Beating Traffic Tickets.  

In the United States over 100,000 people per day get a speeding ticket (statistics posted by statisticbrain.com driving citation statistics).

If you drive in California you are more at risk for getting a ticket than most. Per Statisticbrai.com Driving Citation Statistics, California is ranked number 4 in the top 10 Driving Citation states beat out by only Ohio, Pennsylvania and New York.

How can you avoid becoming statistic? For one, you should avoid making frequent unnecessary lane changes. Frequent unnecessary lane changes often signals to a police officer that you are in a hurry, passing traffic, and you also increase your chance for getting tickets for unsafe lane change or failure to use a turn signal. You should also keep registration tabs up to date and your car in good repair. An officer who sees you speeding may be more inclined to stop you over another car if there is a possible secondary offense you can be cited for in addition to the speeding (2 for 1 deal), like expired registration tabs or equipment violation.  - this blog was written by TicketKick.com, Your Go-To Resource for Beating Traffic Tickets 

To beat your California Red Light, Speeding, Red Light Photo/Camera, Cell Phone, and Other Traffic tickets, call TicketKick.com.  If you don’t win, we don’t win.  It’s as simple as that. Go to www.TicketKick.com or call us at 800-580-1902.

This blog was written to provide information related to traffic tickets in California, is based on opinion only, is not legal advice, and is for informational purposes only.

Oct 15th, 2013

When You See an Emergency Vehicle Should You Move Left Right or Slow Down

When You See an Emergency Vehicle Should You Move Left Right or Slow Down - this blog was written by TicketKick.com, Your Go-To Resource for Beating Traffic Tickets.  

When you see an emergency vehicle should you drive to the left, right, or slow down? It depends. Is the emergency vehicle moving or stationary? Any time you encounter a stationary emergency vehicle on the freeway you are required to move over into the next available adjacent lane or slow down if moving over is not possible or unsafe. Compare to when you encounter a moving emergency vehicle which requires you to move to the right.

Drivers often panic when they realize they are being pulled over by an officer and immediately pull to the left if they are driving in the left lane on the freeway. However a driver is always required to move to the right immediately. A ticket for failing to yield to the right for a moving emergency vehicle is almost twice as much as a ticket for failing to slow down or change lanes for a stationary emergency vehicle and both violations can add one point to a driver’s motor vehicle record.  - this blog was written by TicketKick.com, Your Go-To Resource for Beating Traffic Tickets 

To beat your California Red Light, Speeding, Red Light Photo/Camera, Cell Phone, and Other Traffic tickets, call TicketKick.com.  If you don’t win, we don’t win.  It’s as simple as that. Go to www.TicketKick.com or call us at 800-580-1902.

This blog was written to provide information related to traffic tickets in California, is based on opinion only, is not legal advice, and is for informational purposes only.

Posted in Traffic Tickets
Oct 08th, 2013

New Traffic Law Effective September 2014 the 3 Feet for Safety Act

New Traffic Law Effective September 2014 the 3 Feet for Safety Act - this blog was written by TicketKick.com, Your Go-To Resource for Beating Traffic Tickets.  

There is a new traffic law (starting September 16, 2014) drivers will need to become familiar with. Referred to as the “Three Feet for Safety Act”, drivers will now be required to give three feet of breathing room when passing a bicyclist. If a driver is unable to give three feet of space due to traffic or the road pattern, then the driver can only pass if the pass can be done safely and do so at a reduced speed.

Drivers can be fined anywhere from $100 – 220 depending on whether it is a first offense, a subsequent offense, and whether the bicyclist was injured.

It is not clear yet whether the violation (which is an infraction) will add a point to a driver’s motor vehicle record however it most likely will add a point because currently the passing of bicyclists is covered by Section 21750 (does not specify a passing distance like the new law) and this carries one point.  - this blog was written by TicketKick.com, Your Go-To Resource for Beating Traffic Tickets 

To beat your California Red Light, Speeding, Red Light Photo/Camera, Cell Phone, and Other Traffic tickets, call TicketKick.com.  If you don’t win, we don’t win.  It’s as simple as that. Go to www.TicketKick.com or call us at 800-580-1902.

This blog was written to provide information related to traffic tickets in California, is based on opinion only, is not legal advice, and is for informational purposes only.

Posted in Traffic Tickets
Oct 01st, 2013

What is the difference between Sheriff or Police and Highway Patrol?

What is the difference between Sheriff or Police and Highway Patrol? - this blog was written by TicketKick.com, Your Go-To Resource for Beating Traffic Tickets.  

What is the difference between a Sheriff's Deputy, Police Officer, and the Highway Patrol?

  • A Deputy Sheriff (like Ventura County Sheriff) works for the County Sheriff's Department.
  • A Police Officer (like Los Angeles Police Department) works for the City.
  • The California Highway Patrol provides law enforcement functions in state-operated facilities and provides traffic-related enforcement in various communities as well as on freeways.

All three are peace officers and are authorized under the California penal code with equal police powers anywhere in California.  - this blog was written by TicketKick.com, Your Go-To Resource for Beating Traffic Tickets 

To beat your California Red Light, Speeding, Red Light Photo/Camera, Cell Phone, and Other Traffic tickets, call TicketKick.com.  If you don’t win, we don’t win.  It’s as simple as that. Go to www.TicketKick.com or call us at 800-580-1902.

This blog was written to provide information related to traffic tickets in California, is based on opinion only, is not legal advice, and is for informational purposes only.

Posted in Traffic Tickets
Sep 24th, 2013

Local and State Police Will be Checking Child Passenger Seats

Local and State Police Will be Checking Child Passenger Seats- this blog was written by TicketKick.com, Your Go-To Resource for Beating Traffic Tickets.  

California’s child passenger safety seat law, which went into effect January 1, 2012, now requires children to ride in the back seat of a vehicle, in either a car seat or booster seat, until the age of eight, or until they are 4 feet 9 inches in height.

According to the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, 73 percent of child restraints are not used properly; infant seats have the highest percentage of misuse followed by rear-facing convertible seats. The California Highway Patrol (CHP) will observe National Child Passenger Safety Week from September 15-21 by conducting child safety seat events throughout the state.

While a seatbelt ticket for an adult driver or passenger does not add a point to a motor vehicle record, tickets for child seats do. - this blog was written by TicketKick.com, Your Go-To Resource for Beating Traffic Tickets 

To beat your California Red Light, Speeding, Red Light Photo/Camera, Cell Phone, and Other Traffic tickets, call TicketKick.com.  If you don’t win, we don’t win.  It’s as simple as that. Go to www.TicketKick.com or call us at 800-580-1902.

This blog was written to provide information related to traffic tickets in California, is based on opinion only, is not legal advice, and is for informational purposes only.

Posted in Traffic Tickets
Sep 18th, 2013

When a Traffic Ticket is Issued to a Minor

When a Traffic Ticket is Issued to a Minor - this blog was written by TicketKick.com, Your Go-To Resource for Beating Traffic Tickets.  

An adult can avoid going to court for most violations by simply mailing in the fine for the ticket, pleading not guilty in writing, or requesting a written trial by mail. However the process can be different for a minor.

If your child received traffic ticket while they were under the age of 18 you will likely have to make a trip to the courthouse with them in order for them to take care of their ticket.

Most courthouses require a minor’s parent or guardian appear in court with the minor to handle a traffic ticket. This prevents the minor from being able to keep their parent or guardian in the dark about the ticket.  - this blog was written by TicketKick.com, Your Go-To Resource for Beating Traffic Tickets 

To beat your California Red Light, Speeding, Red Light Photo/Camera, Cell Phone, and Other Traffic tickets, call TicketKick.com.  If you don’t win, we don’t win.  It’s as simple as that. Go to www.TicketKick.com or call us at 800-580-1902.

This blog was written to provide information related to traffic tickets in California, is based on opinion only, is not legal advice, and is for informational purposes only.

Posted in Traffic Tickets
Sep 11th, 2013

Court Has Ruled Drivers May Be Liable For Texting Someone Who They Know Is Driving

Court Has Ruled Drivers May Be Liable For Texting Someone Who They Know Is Driving - this blog was written by TicketKick.com, Your Go-To Resource for Beating Traffic Tickets.  

Reported by CNN.com, a New Jersey court has ruled drivers may be liable for texting someone who they know is driving:

We've all heard the dictum: Don't text and drive. Now a New Jersey state appeals court has an addendum: Don't knowingly text a driver -- or you could be held liable if he causes a crash.

On Tuesday, three appeals court judges agreed with it -- in principle. They ruled that if the sender of text messages knows that the recipient is driving and texting at the same time, a court may hold the sender responsible for distraction and hold him or her liable for the accident."We hold that the sender of a text message can potentially be liable if an accident is caused by texting, but only if the sender knew or had special reason to know that the recipient would view the text while driving and thus be distracted," the court said.  - this blog was written by TicketKick.com, Your Go-To Resource for Beating Traffic Tickets 

To beat your California Red Light, Speeding, Red Light Photo/Camera, Cell Phone, and Other Traffic tickets, call TicketKick.com.  If you don’t win, we don’t win.  It’s as simple as that. Go to www.TicketKick.com or call us at 800-580-1902.

This blog was written to provide information related to traffic tickets in California, is based on opinion only, is not legal advice, and is for informational purposes only.

Sep 04th, 2013

Police Crack Down on Distracted Driving

Police Crack Down on Distracted Driving - this blog was written by TicketKick.com, Your Go-To Resource for Beating Traffic Tickets.  

As reported by NBC Los Angeles news, Pasadena police conducted a crack- down, and placed electronic billboards next to the 210 Freeway to discourage texting while driving.

Pasadena had a distracted-driving death as early as two months ago, police said. More than 3,000 distracted drivers were killed in the U.S. in 2011, according to the California Office of Traffic Safety. In California, 300 to 500 distracted drivers were killed in 2012. Last April, more than 57,000 citations were issued statewide for using a cell phone while driving.

The first violation could cost motorists $162 and each violation after that will be $285. - this blog was written by TicketKick.com, Your Go-To Resource for Beating Traffic Tickets 

To beat your California Red Light, Speeding, Red Light Photo/Camera, Cell Phone, and Other Traffic tickets, call TicketKick.com.  If you don’t win, we don’t win.  It’s as simple as that. Go to www.TicketKick.com or call us at 800-580-1902.

This blog was written to provide information related to traffic tickets in California, is based on opinion only, is not legal advice, and is for informational purposes only.

Aug 28th, 2013